Project Syndicate | The Daily Star
  • India's lost fisherfolk

    Last month, a devastating cyclone swept the southern tip of India, causing immense damage to parts of Kerala, Tamil Nadu, and Lakshadweep.

  • The best hope for the Iranian people

    One of the most extraord-inary things about the current protests in Iran—the largest since the Green Movement in 2009—is that the very people that they are directed against may well have been the people who started them.

  • Breaking Bannon

    The just-released book about Donald Trump and his dysfunctional presidency (Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House) has left much of Washington reeling.

  • The roots of western tribalism

    “It seemed that, in time, all the substance from one image would flow into the other and only one would remain: Leo. He must grow, I must disappear.”

  • The US Donor Relief Act of 2017

    Never has a piece of legislation labelled as both a tax cut and a reform been received with as much disapproval and derision as the bill passed by the US Congress and signed into law by President Donald Trump just before Christmas.

  • Why low inflation is no surprise

    The fact that inflation has remained stubbornly low across the global North has come as a surprise to many economic observers.

  • The Trumping of Asia

    In the last year, the single most pointless wound inflicted by the US on Asia, not to mention itself, was its abandonment of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. In one fell swoop, the once great free-trading nation that was the United States of America died, leaving the global trading system utterly rudderless.

  • The global economy's risky recovery

    A year ago, I predicted that the most distinctive aspect of 2017 would be uncertainty, fueled by, among other things, Donald Trump's election as president in the United States and the United Kingdom's vote to leave the European Union.

  • Misery loves inflation targeters' company

    The United States, Europe, and Japan are all making positive economic strides. In the US, the unemployment rate is falling, and now stands at just over four percent.

  • Monetary policy normalisation in Europe

    When the European Central Bank's Governing Council met on December 14, there was little to surprise financial markets, because no policy changes could be gleaned from public remarks.

  • Preventing the next African famine

    After falling for more than a decade, the number of hungry people in the world is rising once again. This year was marked by the worst global food crisis since World War II, with South Sudan, Yemen, Somalia, and Nigeria either experiencing famine or teetering on the brink.

  • The Pandora's box of the digital age

    Is the world sliding dangerously toward cyber Armageddon? Let us hope not; but let us also apprehend the threat, and focus on what to do about it.

  • Seeing through big tobacco's smokescreen

    We all know how bad tobacco is, that it kills millions of people every year, and that it harms many more. We also know that tobacco

  • Can Europe Sustain the Macron Moment?

    At the start of 2017, many feared that the European project would experience a near-breakdown within the next year.

  • Coming clean in 2018

    It has been a bumper year for making the invisible visible. The last 12 months have overflowed with leaks, allegations, and other disclosures, not just of misconduct by individuals, business leaders, and politicians, but also of proactive schemes to prevent that misconduct from ever coming to light.

  • Two myths about automation

    Robots, machine learning, and artificial intelligence promise to change fundamentally the nature of work. Everyone knows this.

  • India's culture war comes to Bollywood

    Culture and history have become new battlegrounds in India. Debates over the Taj Mahal's position as a symbol of multicultural India have yet to be settled, yet the nation is already being torn apart further by another cultural controversy—this time, over a film.

  • The globalisation of our discontent

    Fifteen years ago, I published Globalization and Its Discontents, a book that sought to explain why there was so much dissatisfaction with globalisation within the developing countries.

  • Europe's Chance to Lead on Robotics and AI

    At least since Mary Shelley created Victor Frankenstein and his iconic monster in 1818, humans have had a morbid fascination with man-made beings that could threaten our existence. From the American television adaptation of...

  • Europe's crisis starts at home

    Deep divisions within Europe are increasingly threatening the values upon which the European project of “ever closer union” is based. In 2015, during the refugee crisis, many commentators saw a divide between German Chancellor Angela Merkel's Willkommenskultur (welcoming culture) and Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán's vision of ethnic purity: a Western Europe of bridges versus an Eastern Europe of walls.

  • Poverty is also a psychosocial problem

    Being poor is a highly shameful experience, degrading one's dignity and sense of self-worth. While the manifestations and causes of poverty differ, the humiliation that accompanies it is universal.

  • Inequality comes to Asia

    From China to India, Asian countries' rapid economic expansion has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty in recent decades. Yet the income distribution has lately worsened, with inequality now potentially even more severe in Asia than in the developed economies of the West.

  • The Upgrade Myth

    From the pocket calculator to the Prius, I've always been what they call an “early adopter.” I was a technology enthusiast, a lover of progress, eager to move into the future. No more.

  • Central Banks in the dock

    On November 11, 1997, the Bank of England took a big step toward independence, courtesy of the second reading in the House of Commons of a bill amending the Bank Act of 1946. The bill gave legislative affirmation to the decision,

  • A Federal Spain in a Federal Europe

    I have always been a profound admirer of Spanish democracy, but especially since February 23, 1981. On that dramatic day, Colonel Antonio Tejero attempted a coup d'état against the young democratic regime.

  • Keeping US policymaking honest

    In a recent appearance here at the University of California, Berkeley, Alice Rivlin expressed optimism about the future of economic policymaking in the United States. What Rivlin—who served as Vice Chair of the US Federal Reserve,

  • The curious case of the missing defaults

    Booms and busts in international capital flows and commodity prices, as well as the vagaries of international interest rates, have long been associated with economic crises, especially—but not exclusively—in emerging markets.

  • Has Trump captured the Fed?

    One of the important powers of any US president is to appoint members and heads of the many agencies that are responsible for implementing the country's laws and regulations and, in many cases, governing the economy.

  • Publicising plight journalists

    Publicising the plight of journalists

    Every five days, on average, somewhere in the world, a journalist is murdered for being a journalist. Nine out of ten times, no one is prosecuted, creating an atmosphere of impunity that extends beyond death threats or violence.

  • Fake news and biased news

    Interviews are always tricky. If an unscrupulous interviewer is looking for a particular answer or claim, they have the power to edit, manipulate, or even rewrite their subject's words to that end.

Top